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Language and structure

Like all languages, English is a coded system: the most effective way for adult writers to begin doing this is not by memorising the code rules (although these are important) but by coming to terms with the structure of written language. From this structural understanding, we are better able to rationalize the rules for ourselves and in this way gain confidence in applying them.

Before going further, you might like to pause for a moment to think about structure. Look around you for a moment. Tables and chairs, libraries and gardens, plants and sentences: each has an underlying structure that enables it to function effectively. In fact, structure is always a key factor in functional effectiveness.

Consider, for example, the structure of a bridge. Similarly, sentences are structured to carry meaning; the more soundly the sentence has been constructed, the more effectively the meaning can be transmitted by the writer and understood by the reader.


audio-visual-bw The following audio-visual presentation shows a bridge as an example of structure.

Better Sentences


Language and Structure

Better Sentences


Language and Structure

A bridge needs to be properly structured to allow traffic to pass safely and effectively from one position to another.

Similarly, sentences are properly structured to effectively carry meaning from the writer to the reader.


The following demonstrates how, with good structure, the meaning can be effectively transmitted.

Structure - Bridge

Better Sentences

Language and Structure

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